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  • Originally posted by Markburn1 View Post
    Happy to see this thread back on track.
    Me, too. And I'll be damned if I allow this thread that belongs to all of us to be the only 2 star rated thread on the foo. If I work hard enough, I hope we can earn that 5th star back?

    Human footprints near ice age lake suggest surprisingly early arrival in the Americas




    Between 23,000 and 21,000 years ago, people squished through the mud along a lakeshore in what is now New Mexico, alone and in small groups, leaving behind their footprints. Or at least that’s the conclusion of a new paper that Oregon State University, Corvallis, archaeologist Loren Davis calls “potentially groundbreaking.” If the dates are right, the discovery would be the strongest evidence yet that people reached the Americas during the middle of the last ice age, thousands of years earlier than many archaeologists thought.

    “If that’s true … it’s going to be a revolution in the way that we think about archaeology in the Americas,” says Davis, who wasn’t involved with the work. It might reignite debates about how people first reached the continent from Asia. But Davis and others would like corroboration of the surprising dates before they rewrite their understanding of when and how people arrived.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

    Comment


    • This better get my 5th Star back:

      Virgin Births Documented in Rare Endangered Bird Population – The California Condor




      The temptation to quote Jurassic Park must have been irresistible for conservation scientists at a San Diego Zoo breeding program for critically-endangered California condors, when it was discovered that two females had conceived through “parthenogenesis,” also known as a virgin birth.

      The scientists looked around at the 467 males to see who might have mated with the birds, and announced the first virgin birth ever observed in condors only after every male in the breeding program was tested.

      Furthermore, it was the first time asexual reproduction was ever recorded where a female of any species was known to have access to a mate.

      Only around 500 California condors live in the southwestern United States and in Mexico.
      https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/virg...fornia-condor/
      Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
      Mark Twain.

      Comment


      • POP QUIZ:

        2 Hydrogen Molecules
        1 Oxygen Molecule



        WHAT AM I?
        Allow myself to introduce....myself...

        Comment


        • Originally posted by gozagswoohoo View Post
          POP QUIZ:

          2 Hydrogen Molecules
          1 Oxygen Molecule



          WHAT AM I?
          Carbon Dioxide?

          This was an actual page in my 10 year old's curriculum last year. I'm really glad our school got rid of this vendor and are using their own curriculum this year for online work. I'd like to say this was one of the more egregious errors but it was something like this at least once a week.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Jazzgirl_127 View Post
            Carbon Dioxide?

            This was an actual page in my 10 year old's curriculum last year. I'm really glad our school got rid of this vendor and are using their own curriculum this year for online work. I'd like to say this was one of the more egregious errors but it was something like this at least once a week.

            Oh gosh hahaha.
            Allow myself to introduce....myself...

            Comment


            • Gonna Dare to Post Some Science:

              What the Tonga volcano’s past tells us about what to expect next




              On January 15, an underwater volcano in the island nation of Tonga erupted with the explosive force of a nuclear bomb, and it may not be done just yet.

              The eruption of Hunga-Tonga-Hunga-Ha’apai volcano in the South Pacific launched a towering, mushroom-shaped cloud of ash and dust at least 20 kilometers into the atmosphere — and possibly as high as 39 kilometers by one estimate. The blast sent shock waves that are still rippling through the atmosphere a week later.

              The volcano may now return to a period of dormancy after releasing its fury. But it also might not. Researchers who have studied Hunga-Tonga-Hunga-Ha’apai’s eruptive history, recorded in layers of hardened ash and fragments of volcanic pumice, say that this volcano has tended to erupt explosively every thousand years or so — and not just once, but in multiple pulses.

              “Time will tell, and the next few days may tell us a lot,” he says.

              Tonga has no active seismometers — and communications from the island nation remain largely incapacitated by ashfall and flooding. But with the help of satellite images, Cronin and others are keeping close watch over the region, hunting for changes to the volcano’s shape or height or other indicators that may signal that magma might be on the move again.
              Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
              Mark Twain.

              Comment


              • Neat article on future telescopes: https://www.techradar.com/news/beyon...AI6IaWLv4TRqUY

                Of all the giant observatories being planned the Vera C. Rubin Observatory is perhaps the most exciting – and it’s about to see ‘first light’.

                An roughly 26-foot/8-meter telescope on Cerro Pachón in Chile, it will begin an all-sky astronomical survey in 2022 that could revolutionize astronomy.

                It will survey the entire visible sky in just three nights, effectively producing a motion picture of our Universe that will instantly identify any moving object and any minor change in the night sky.

                Astronomers are expecting it to find many more objects in the Solar System – chiefly Pluto-like dwarf planets in the outer regions and "Planet 9" if it’s out there – as well as thousands of supernovae.

                Rubin will also find 90% of near-Earth objects – asteroids – larger than 300 meters, then calculate if they are a threat to Earth.

                Equipped with a 21-foot/6.5-meter mirror and a 3.2-gigapixel CCD imaging camera, it’s expected to take 1,000 images each night, totaling 15TB of data. It was built next to the Gemini South telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile.
                The GUB Resource Library: Links to: Stats, Blogs, Brackets, & More. . .

                “They go to school. They do their homework. They shake hands. They say please and thank you. But once you throw that ball up, they will rip your heart out and watch you bleed.” -- Jay Bilas

                Comment


                • Originally posted by RenoZag View Post
                  Reno, I had read about that one - and that's just stunning what it can do. There are scientists at Cal Tech absolutely convinced there is a planet nine, a solid planet about 5 earth masses, and much further out than Pluto and are really looking forward to it.

                  The James Webb, seven times bigger than Hubble, is about to come on line in the next 3-5 months, and it's at "Lagrange point" - one of 6 where the gravity between the earth, sun, moon, all align to keep something perfectly stable but it's WAY out there, much further away than the moon.

                  And we're going to the moon in 2025. The Chinese are going next year, but there's about to be a space race again. We're lucky, we have Elon - even though I can't stand the guy personally - his new Heavy Lift Starship is much stronger than the Saturn V - previously the biggest rocket ever made, and can launch for $2 Million each time bc it comes back down to land, it would be $2 billion if it wasn't reusable.
                  Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
                  Mark Twain.

                  Comment


                  • Just hanging out on the third rock from the sun. . .

                    Q: What is the order from largest to smallest: galaxy, universe, star, asteroids, planets, moons, solar system?

                    A: Let's describe them from smallest to largest. In fact the size order is not exact as there are exceptions.
                    • An asteroid is a rocky body which lies in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. They are typically quite small objects. The largest asteroid Ceres has been reclassified as a dwarf planet.
                    • A moon is typically a rocky body which is in orbit around a planet. Some moons such as our Moon are quite large and are typically bigger than asteroids. Some moons can actually be smaller than some asteroids.
                    • A planet is a nearly spherical body which is in orbit around the Sun. Planets are larger than moons.
                    • A star is what planets orbit around. It is the source of light and heat. Our Sun is a star which is many times bigger than all of the planets.
                    • A solar system is a star and all of its planets, asteroids, comets and other bodies. It is significantly bigger than a star.
                    • A galaxy, such as our Milky Way Galaxy, is a collection of solar systems orbiting around a central core. Most galaxies have a supermassive black hole at their centers.
                    • Galaxies also form clusters which are large scale structures.
                    • The universe is everything. It contains billions of galaxies.



                    https://socratic.org/questions/what-...teroids-planet

                    Last edited by RenoZag; 02-01-2022, 05:28 AM.
                    The GUB Resource Library: Links to: Stats, Blogs, Brackets, & More. . .

                    “They go to school. They do their homework. They shake hands. They say please and thank you. But once you throw that ball up, they will rip your heart out and watch you bleed.” -- Jay Bilas

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by RenoZag View Post
                      Just hanging out on the third rock from the sun. . .

                      Q: What is the order from largest to smallest: galaxy, universe, star, asteroids, planets, moons, solar system?

                      A: Let's describe them from smallest to largest. In fact the size order is not exact as there are exceptions.
                      • An asteroid is a rocky body which lies in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. They are typically quite small objects. The largest asteroid Ceres has been reclassified as a dwarf planet.
                      • A moon is typically a rocky body which is in orbit around a planet. Some moons such as our Moon are quite large and are typically bigger than asteroids. Some moons can actually be smaller than some asteroids.
                      • A planet is a nearly spherical body which is in orbit around the Sun. Planets are larger than moons.
                      • A star is what planets orbit around. It is the source of light and heat. Our Sun is a star which is many times bigger than all of the planets.
                      • A solar system is a star and all of its planets, asteroids, comets and other bodies. It is significantly bigger than a star.
                      • A galaxy, such as our Milky Way Galaxy, is a collection of solar systems orbiting around a central core. Most galaxies have a supermassive black hole at their centres.
                      • Galaxies also form clusters which are large scale structures.
                      • The universe is everything. It contains billions of galaxies.



                      https://socratic.org/questions/what-...teroids-planet



                      On the Nova presentation about the big bang it made the point the universe is expanding. It is expanding at a faster rate all the time. I had heard it before so it was no surprise. What it makes me curious about is if the universe is everything and it is expanding, where is it going. What is it expanding into. Is space bigger than the universe so the universe expands into space? On the other hand if the universe is everything how could anything including space be bigger?
                      .
                      .
                      .
                      "thnk god for few" jazzdelmar(12/12/11 12:50pm)
                      .
                      "When most of us couldn't buy a basket. Where do we get off anyway?!" siliconzag (11/17/06 5:45:41 pm)
                      .
                      I am monitoring the price of a donut
                      .

                      Comment


                      • My friend's little sister just moved to Chicago to work at their planetarium. She's carved herself quite a niche in the past decade or so at our science center and I'm going to miss hearing her voice during the "star parties" the science center hosts.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by RenoZag View Post
                          Just hanging out on the third rock from the sun. . .

                          Q: What is the order from largest to smallest: galaxy, universe, star, asteroids, planets, moons, solar system?

                          A: Let's describe them from smallest to largest. In fact the size order is not exact as there are exceptions.
                          • An asteroid is a rocky body which lies in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. They are typically quite small objects. The largest asteroid Ceres has been reclassified as a dwarf planet.
                          • A moon is typically a rocky body which is in orbit around a planet. Some moons such as our Moon are quite large and are typically bigger than asteroids. Some moons can actually be smaller than some asteroids.
                          • A planet is a nearly spherical body which is in orbit around the Sun. Planets are larger than moons.
                          • A star is what planets orbit around. It is the source of light and heat. Our Sun is a star which is many times bigger than all of the planets.
                          • A solar system is a star and all of its planets, asteroids, comets and other bodies. It is significantly bigger than a star.
                          • A galaxy, such as our Milky Way Galaxy, is a collection of solar systems orbiting around a central core. Most galaxies have a supermassive black hole at their centers.
                          • Galaxies also form clusters which are large scale structures.
                          • The universe is everything. It contains billions of galaxies.



                          https://socratic.org/questions/what-...teroids-planet

                          And now they think there may be 10 to the 500th power of universes. NO, I'm not kidding. They compare universes to soap bubbles. "The multiverse"

                          Amazingly, our sun is one of the bigger ones, called something "Yellow" - most stars, by far, are red dwarfs, and if it weren't for the radioactive bursts they love to give (after a while they settle down, 10 billion years or so) you want to be on a planet very close to a red dwarf bc they last trillions of years instead of the 4-5 billion more our sun will last.

                          Not only is it academic and no issue bc our species will be long gone (either the good way or bad), but in about 600 million years, the sun will be 10% brighter and the earth will become the second Venus, our oceans will boil, greenhouse gasses really takeover (doing well enough now) and we end up at 800 degrees in about 800 million years, so it doesn't matter that our star will expand and eat the Earth as a red giant in 4 billion years.

                          Besides, at some point, the next logical "evolution" is to machines/computer/sentience and ideally a soul and human emotions, that becomes a game changer bc minus 200 degrees and no oxygen on Mars is no big deal, build a city, or live in space and go outside for maintenance, no difference.

                          JG - What a job your sister has. That must be so amazing to do those presentations.
                          Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
                          Mark Twain.

                          Comment


                          • Antipodes Map

                            https://www.antipodesmap.com/

                            At least once in a lifetime you've asked what is under your feet, on the other side of the world.

                            You can learn a little bit of geography in a funny and simple way.

                            It is free without any kind of annoying ads.
                            The GUB Resource Library: Links to: Stats, Blogs, Brackets, & More. . .

                            “They go to school. They do their homework. They shake hands. They say please and thank you. But once you throw that ball up, they will rip your heart out and watch you bleed.” -- Jay Bilas

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by RenoZag View Post
                              I'm off the south east coast of South Africa
                              Bring back the OCC

                              Comment


                              • That is a very fun exercise!!

                                I am in the middle of the Indian Ocean, BUT - Very close to the Maldives. My current significant other and I are going either to Bali or the Maldives once we complete a year long project we have going right now.
                                Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
                                Mark Twain.

                                Comment

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