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Notable Passages: 2021

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  • Dean Stockwell, ‘Quantum Leap’ and ‘Blue Velvet’ Star, Dead at 85


    https://www.rollingstone.com/movies/...-obit-1255247/


    GoZags!!!
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    "thnk god for few" jazzdelmar(12/12/11 12:50pm)
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    "When most of us couldn't buy a basket. Where do we get off anyway?!" siliconzag (11/17/06 5:45:41 pm)
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    I am monitoring the price of a donut
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    Comment


    • Pedro Feliciano, 45, in his sleep. Dude's nickname was Perpetual Pedro because anytime you needed him... he was ready to pitch.

      "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

      "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

      Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

      2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

      Comment


      • Max Cleland, who lost both legs and an arm during the Vietnam War and later became a senator from Georgia, died on Tuesday at his home in Atlanta. He was 79.

        After a grenade accident in Vietnam in 1968, Mr. Cleland spent 18 months recuperating. He served in local politics in his native Georgia and as head of the federal Veterans Administration, now the Department of Veterans Affairs, before he was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1996.

        He majored in history at Stetson University in Florida and graduated in 1964. He later received a master’s degree in history from Emory University. It was during a fall semester at American University in Washington in 1963 that he resolved to become a senator.

        But first, he would enlist. His father and most of his male relatives had fought in World War II, and Max did not want to miss the war of his generation. He joined the Army in 1965 and volunteered for Vietnam in 1967.

        On April 8, 1968, just days before his tour was to end, Captain Cleland was on a rescue mission in the village of Khe Sanh when he noticed a hand grenade on the ground. He picked it up and it detonated, instantly severing his right leg and right arm; his left leg was amputated within the hour. He was later awarded the Bronze Star and a Silver Star for meritorious service.
        The GUB Resource Library: Links to: Stats, Blogs, Brackets, & More. . .

        “They go to school. They do their homework. They shake hands. They say please and thank you. But once you throw that ball up, they will rip your heart out and watch you bleed.” -- Jay Bilas

        Comment


        • Dean Stockwell, who began his seven-decade acting career as a child in the 1940s and later had key roles in films including “A Long Day’s Journey Into Night” in 1962 and “Blue Velvet” in 1986, while also making his mark in television, most notably as the cigar-smoking Al Calavicci on the hit science fiction series “Quantum Leap,” died on Sunday. He was 85.

          Mr. Stockwell had a hot-and-cold relationship with acting that caused him to leave show business for years at a time. But he nonetheless amassed more than 200 film and television acting credits from 1945 to 2015, as well as occasional stage roles.
          The GUB Resource Library: Links to: Stats, Blogs, Brackets, & More. . .

          “They go to school. They do their homework. They shake hands. They say please and thank you. But once you throw that ball up, they will rip your heart out and watch you bleed.” -- Jay Bilas

          Comment


          • F.W. de Klerk, who as president of South Africa dismantled the apartheid system that he and his ancestors had helped put in place, died at his home near Cape Town on Thursday. He was 85.

            A member of a prominent Afrikaner family, Mr. de Klerk had vehemently defended the separation of the races during his long climb up the political ladder. But once he took over as president in 1989, he stunned his deeply divided nation, and the wider world, by reconsidering South Africa’s racist ways, a step that led to his sharing the Nobel Peace Prize with Nelson Mandela, whom he had released from prison.
            The GUB Resource Library: Links to: Stats, Blogs, Brackets, & More. . .

            “They go to school. They do their homework. They shake hands. They say please and thank you. But once you throw that ball up, they will rip your heart out and watch you bleed.” -- Jay Bilas

            Comment


            • Moody Blues drummer, co-founder Graeme Edge dies at 80

              https://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment...es-80-81124463
              Not even a smile? What's your problem!

              Comment


              • 80?

                Man..............
                But we don't play nobody.

                Comment


                • New York Giants HOF'er Sam Huff:


                  https://centurylink.net/news/read/ar...m_huff_dies-ap
                  But we don't play nobody.

                  Comment


                  • It was a few days ago....but Lisa Rinna's mom.
                    Allow myself to introduce....myself...

                    Comment


                    • Bob Bondurant, a master racecar driver who was better known for his driving school in California and later in Arizona, where he tutored actors like Paul Newman, Tom Cruise and Christian Bale for their onscreen racing roles, died on Nov. 12 in Paradise Valley, Ariz. He was 88.

                      Mr. Bondurant began attracting attention in the racing world in 1959, when he won 18 of the 20 races he entered behind the wheel of a Corvette.
                      The GUB Resource Library: Links to: Stats, Blogs, Brackets, & More. . .

                      “They go to school. They do their homework. They shake hands. They say please and thank you. But once you throw that ball up, they will rip your heart out and watch you bleed.” -- Jay Bilas

                      Comment


                      • Bill Virdon was one of the major leagues’ smoothest-fielding center fielders of the 1950s and early ’60s. He managed four teams, winning division championships with the Pittsburgh Pirates and Houston Astros and bringing a surprising Yankee team to the brink of one. But many remember him most for hitting a seemingly routine ground ball that was anything but: It sent the Pirates on their way to a dramatic Game 7 victory over the Yankees in the 1960 World Series.

                        Often described as “bespectacled,” given the relative rarity of ballplayers with eyeglasses, Virdon, who died at 90 on Tuesday, was the National League’s rookie of the year with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1955 but spent almost his entire career with the Pirates, playing alongside the future Hall of Fame right fielder Roberto Clemente.
                        The GUB Resource Library: Links to: Stats, Blogs, Brackets, & More. . .

                        “They go to school. They do their homework. They shake hands. They say please and thank you. But once you throw that ball up, they will rip your heart out and watch you bleed.” -- Jay Bilas

                        Comment


                        • My very 1st baseball memory, Game 7 of the 1960 World Series. Had the Yankees.
                          But we don't play nobody.

                          Comment


                          • Stephen Sondheim, Titan of the American Musical, Is Dead at 91

                            https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/26/t...heim-dead.html
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                            .
                            "thnk god for few" jazzdelmar(12/12/11 12:50pm)
                            .
                            "When most of us couldn't buy a basket. Where do we get off anyway?!" siliconzag (11/17/06 5:45:41 pm)
                            .
                            I am monitoring the price of a donut
                            .

                            Comment


                            • Golfer Lee Elder:


                              https://www.cbssports.com/golf/news/...rs-dies-at-87/
                              But we don't play nobody.

                              Comment


                              • Hall of Famer Claude Humphrey, a longtime defensive end for the Atlanta Falcons, has died at the age of 77. He died on Friday night, one of his family members told the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

                                "The entire Pro Football Hall of Fame family mourns the passing of Claude Humphrey," Hall of Fame president Jim Porter said in a statement. "Known as a hard worker and a reliable teammate, Humphrey was always willing to help the team out wherever needed and knew success was achieved collectively. His humble spirit guided him on and off the field."
                                The GUB Resource Library: Links to: Stats, Blogs, Brackets, & More. . .

                                “They go to school. They do their homework. They shake hands. They say please and thank you. But once you throw that ball up, they will rip your heart out and watch you bleed.” -- Jay Bilas

                                Comment

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