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Songs That Make You Change the Station

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  • Songs That Make You Change the Station

    What is a song you refuse to listen to because it's sad or revives sad / bad memories ?

    I'll start: "Against All Odds" (Take a Look At Me Now) by Phil Collins.

    It was a Top Ten hit in 1984 at the time I was going through a divorce. . .couldn't escape that tune on the radio. Immediately changed the station.
    The GUB Resource Library: Links to: Stats, Blogs, Brackets, & More. . .

    “They go to school. They do their homework. They shake hands. They say please and thank you. But once you throw that ball up, they will rip your heart out and watch you bleed.” -- Jay Bilas

  • #2
    Eye of the Tiger by Survivor

    No particular reason... just hate the song.
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

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    • #3
      Complicated by Avril Lavigne. I was on a road trip around the time this song peaked. It seemed like all radio stations had it on repeat. I had to shut the radio off to get away from it.

      Sent from my SM-G981V using Tapatalk
      You can't make a half sandwich. If it's not half of a whole sandwich, it's just a small sandwich.

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      • #4
        We Built This City on Rock and Roll.

        Enough said.
        Birds aren’t real.

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        • #5
          Anything by Rush.
          My posts indicate that I don't seem to follow college basketball all that closely.

          Comment


          • #6
            Anything by Billy Joel.
            But we don't play nobody.

            Comment


            • #7
              Anything by Bob Seager… reminds me of all my bad memories of Michigan. Since he’s from there they beat all of his songs to death. Buried them… dug them up and proceeded to beat them again
              "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

              "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

              Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

              2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 23dpg View Post
                We Built This City on Rock and Roll.

                Enough said.
                Edit to add: Add in #2 Achy Breaky Heart. Just horrible.

                https://web.archive.org/web/20050124...es.aspx?id=819

                2
                BILLY RAY CYRUS
                “Achy Breaky Heart” 1992
                At least the haircut never caught on. Oh, wait…

                Country, but not as we know it. Written by Vietnam vet Don “Pickle ####” Von Tress in the style of a brain-dead “Blue Suede Shoes,” “Achy Breaky Heart” represented every prejudice non-believers have about country: It was trite, it was inane, it was big in trailer parks and it was thoroughly enjoyed by the obese. Strangely, it was covered by Bruce Springsteen, with slightly less irony than you might imagine; still, this does not make it good.

                Worst Moment An instrumental break that single-handedly rejuvenated the line-dancing fad.

                1
                STARSHIP
                “We Built This City” 1985
                The truly horrible sound of a band taking the corporate dollar while sneering at those who take the corporate dollar

                The lyrics of “We Built This City” appear to restate the importance of the band once known as Jefferson Airplane within San Francisco’s ’60s rock scene. Not so, says former leader Grace Slick, who by 1985 had handed her band to singer Mickey Thomas and a shadowy team of outside songwriters.

                “Everybody thought we were talking about San Francisco. We weren’t,” Slick says. “It was written by an Englishman, Bernie Taupin, about Los Angeles in the early ’70s. Nobody was telling the truth!”

                Certainly not Starship, who spend the song carrying on as if they invented rock & roll rebellion, while churning out music that encapsulates all that was wrong with rock in the ’80s: Sexless and corporate, it sounds less like a song than something built in a lab by a team of record-company executives.

                The result was so awful that years afterward, it seems to bring on a personality disorder in the woman who sang it. “This is not me,” Slick remarks when reminded of the 1985 chart-topper. “Now you’re an actor. It’s the same as Meryl Streep playing Joan of Arc.”

                Worst Moment “Who cares, they’re always changing corporation names,” sneers Slick — whose band had changed its name three times.
                Birds aren’t real.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by 23dpg View Post
                  Edit to add: Add in #2 Achy Breaky Heart. Just horrible.

                  https://web.archive.org/web/20050124...es.aspx?id=819

                  2
                  BILLY RAY CYRUS
                  “Achy Breaky Heart” 1992
                  At least the haircut never caught on. Oh, wait…

                  Country, but not as we know it. Written by Vietnam vet Don “Pickle ####” Von Tress in the style of a brain-dead “Blue Suede Shoes,” “Achy Breaky Heart” represented every prejudice non-believers have about country: It was trite, it was inane, it was big in trailer parks and it was thoroughly enjoyed by the obese. Strangely, it was covered by Bruce Springsteen, with slightly less irony than you might imagine; still, this does not make it good.

                  Worst Moment An instrumental break that single-handedly rejuvenated the line-dancing fad.

                  1
                  STARSHIP
                  “We Built This City” 1985
                  The truly horrible sound of a band taking the corporate dollar while sneering at those who take the corporate dollar

                  The lyrics of “We Built This City” appear to restate the importance of the band once known as Jefferson Airplane within San Francisco’s ’60s rock scene. Not so, says former leader Grace Slick, who by 1985 had handed her band to singer Mickey Thomas and a shadowy team of outside songwriters.

                  “Everybody thought we were talking about San Francisco. We weren’t,” Slick says. “It was written by an Englishman, Bernie Taupin, about Los Angeles in the early ’70s. Nobody was telling the truth!”

                  Certainly not Starship, who spend the song carrying on as if they invented rock & roll rebellion, while churning out music that encapsulates all that was wrong with rock in the ’80s: Sexless and corporate, it sounds less like a song than something built in a lab by a team of record-company executives.

                  The result was so awful that years afterward, it seems to bring on a personality disorder in the woman who sang it. “This is not me,” Slick remarks when reminded of the 1985 chart-topper. “Now you’re an actor. It’s the same as Meryl Streep playing Joan of Arc.”

                  Worst Moment “Who cares, they’re always changing corporation names,” sneers Slick — whose band had changed its name three times.
                  Those songs are both awful. I can’t compete with those submissions.

                  I will list anything by Limp Bizkit as my submission.

                  I loved the alt-rock movement of the early 1990s. I loved Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Rage Against the Machine, Jane’s Addiction, Soundgarden, Faith No More, Radiohead, and all of their quirky peers that found a home on modern rock radio between 1991-1997. This was music for kids who didn’t party. This was music for lonely kids. This was music for nerdy kids who played Dungeons & Dragons and never got the girl...pretty much me and all of my closest high school friends.

                  And then modern rock radio stations started playing Limp Bizkit, a band who somehow turned music for weird kids into music for the frat boys who bullied them...
                  “No team in the country has a better winning percentage against power conference teams since 2017 than Gonzaga... the Zags are playing above average teams in the best leagues in the country and winning 78% of the time.”

                  -Ken Pomeroy-

                  https://www.ksl.com/article/50342950...in-perspective

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                  • #10
                    There are a few Mellencamp songs that remind me of a bad time. I always change the channel. There are others as well, but some, I like the song too much so manage to ignore the pain.
                    Not even a smile? What's your problem!

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                    • #11
                      Glycerin by Bush.

                      It's an immediate turn-off the radio and put it out of its misery.

                      Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
                      There's a fine line between fishing and just standing on the shore like an idiot. - Steven Wright

                      Beat everyone, and enjoy drinking from a chalice filled with their salty tears.
                      Surfmonkey89

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                      • #12
                        As much as I enjoy Chuck Berry ....and he was a incredible performer and talent..... "My Ding A ling" is just in bad taste....and I think it was a huge hit...hard to imagine the music that terrified our parents is now on PBS Specials .....how the time flies....

                        If I could live my live over I would rather have been a bird or a musician ....

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                        • #13
                          "Billy, Don't Be a Hero" is sonic vomit.
                          The GUB Resource Library: Links to: Stats, Blogs, Brackets, & More. . .

                          “They go to school. They do their homework. They shake hands. They say please and thank you. But once you throw that ball up, they will rip your heart out and watch you bleed.” -- Jay Bilas

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            “We Built this City” or most any song by Jefferson Starship


                            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                            'I found it is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay… small acts of kindness and love.'
                            - Gandalf the Grey

                            ________________________________



                            Foo Time

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                            • #15
                              Ted Nugent


                              Sent via mobile device
                              The GUB Resource Library: Links to: Stats, Blogs, Brackets, & More. . .

                              “They go to school. They do their homework. They shake hands. They say please and thank you. But once you throw that ball up, they will rip your heart out and watch you bleed.” -- Jay Bilas

                              Comment

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